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From the latest Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) Newsletter – an article from PNAS on ‘The Boon and Bane of the Impact Factor’ (and abuse of the drug ‘Sciagra’)

December 23, 2010 1 comment

A very hard-hitting piece on the abuses of impact factors and their pernicious effects on how science is done. Sten Grillner is a Kavli Prize winner who recently gave a lecture at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience. It is worth musing on whether or not the widespread use and abuse of impact factors is science’s very own special version of grade inflation.

From FENS: The editorial “Impacting our Young” by Eve Marder (Past President of the American Society for Neuroscience), Helmut Kettenmann (Past President of FENS) and Sten Grillner (President of FENS) has been published in the most recent issue of PNAS (PNAS 2010 107 (50) 21233).

A quote:

It is our contention that overreliance on the impact factor is a corrupting force on our young scientists (and also on more senior scientists) and that we would be well-served to divest ourselves of its influence.

And another:

The hypocrisy inherent in choosing a journal because of its impact factor, rather than the science it publishes,undermines the ideals by which science should be done.

And their advice:

Minimally, we must forego using impact factors as a proxy for excellence and replace them with indepth analyses of the science produced by candidates for positions and grants. This requires more time and effort from senior scientists and cooperation from international communities, because not every country has the necessary expertise in all areas of science.

It reminds me off a piece lampooning impact factors by Uinseonn O’Breathnach (me too) in Current Biology a few years ago, entitled ‘Sciagra‘:

What is it? Sciagra™ is a psychologically self-administered drug that acts on grammar and vocabulary in scientific papers with the aim of improving performance, or at least convincing the user that it does.

How widespread is its use? It’s almost impossible to avoid in impact factor zones above 8. Some disciplines even have their own compounds. Psyagra™ and Genagra™ are particularly dangerous new ‘society’ versions, especially potent and unfortunately accessible to journalists who have to write “It’s the Brain wot does it!” or “Scientists produce creature that is half human, half grant reviewer” stories to tight deadlines.

How do I recognise its use by others? The symptoms are easy to spot. A user will always tell you the impact factor of the journal rather than what the paper is about. They will display an intensity unrelated to the importance of the finding and an inability to cite anything published before 1999. They frequently meet rejection of a paper with a complaint to the editor, and seasoned users may even make unsolicited phone calls to editors to make their complaint.

It seems to be available on open access.

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Nobel hopefuls by the numbers – The Scientist – Magazine of the Life Sciences

September 21, 2010 Leave a comment

Nobel hopefuls by the numbers – The Scientist – Magazine of the Life Sciences.

The researcher who developed induced pluripotent stem cells, the biochemist who invented DNA microarrays, and the immunologist who discovered dendritic cells are just a few of the scientists whose citation records are robust enough to attract a Nobel Prize this year, according to Thomson Reuters, the company that manages the Web of Science citation indexing tool — brainchild of The Scientist founder Eugene Garfield. The company released their 2010 Nobel Prize predictions today (21st September).

Read more: Nobel hopefuls by the numbers – The Scientist – Magazine of the Life Sciences http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57694/#ixzz10CQAzkSh